Peace Action Statement on US Helicopter Crash at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan

August 12, 2015

Okinawa, Japan — August 12, 2015 — Hours after Paul Kawika Martin, the policy and political director of the United State’s largest peace organization, Peace Action, addressed protesters in front of Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan a U.S. helicopter crashed in the ocean near the base. He is available for phone, in-person or Skype interviews in Okinawa and released the following statement from in front of the base:

“I am glad that all 17 crew were rescued from the helicopter crash at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan. I hope that all physical and mental injuries heal quickly.

This accident happens one day before the 11th anniversary of another U.S. helicopter crash that occurred at the Okinawa International University. Accidents such as these occur regularly and the consequences could be much worse with residential communities extremely close to U.S. bases in Okinawa.

This is why nearly 80% of Okinawans oppose U.S. bases. Peace Action supports Okinawans in their request that the U.S. military leave the island. U.S. bases take up nearly a fifth of the island, which is larger than the U.S Virgin Islands. Despite their opposition, Okinawans are forced to pay through their tax dollars subsidies to the U.S. government to help cover costs of the bases while they suffer noise pollution, contaminated lands, chemical spill and aircraft accident risk and possible loss of income from tourism.

Though the U.S. is taking a small step by planning to move some troops to Guam, they plan on expanding the base in Henoko by filling in delicate, ocean reef environments to build two large runways. It is time that the U.S. listen to local Okinawans and relocate all U.S. military bases to Hawaii and other alternate locations where similar training can occur.”


US taxpayer dollars, $250 million of em, spent to train sixty, that’s 60, Syrian rebels (that’s fewer fighters than an NFL roster, and more expensive per gladiator!)

July 8, 2015

20141209_MoveOn_ISIS_FBshareable_1EndEndlessWarNotBranded

How about instead of throwing this money down the proverbial crapper, we use it to potty-train all the children in the world. Or for refugee/humanitarian assistance in Syria. This failure (which we’ve also seen with “training” “our guys” in Iraq and Afghanistan) was inevitable, since nobody could even guess what “success” would look like. Shut this asinine program down now!

PoliticoPro: US has spent hundreds of millions for just 60 Syrian fighters

By AUSTIN WRIGHT

 

7/8/15 3:41 PM EDT

How much has the United States spent to train that whopping force of 60 Syrian rebels to take on the Islamic State? Well, according to basic math, about $4 million for each of them.

POLITICO has learned that of the $500 million requested last year for the “train-and-equip” program, roughly half has been spent.

“About half of the $500 million has been obligated thus far, mostly on equipment required to train the Syrian fighters,” said a congressional aide who was not authorized to speak publicly.

The fact that the Obama administration has spent so much on a program that has yielded so few vetted fighters makes clear just how difficult it is to find “moderate” Syrian rebels who can make it through the stringent screening process — and are willing to prioritize the fight against ISIL over the civil war against Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The figure also provides new ammo for Republican critics of President Barack Obama’s strategy for dealing with ISIL, with Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) on Tuesday blasting the president’s Syria plan as “delusional.”

McCain’s statement came after Defense Secretary Ash Carter told the Armed Services panel during a hearing that just 60 fighters had made it through the vetting process for the three-month-old Syria train-and-equip program — a number he conceded was “much smaller than we hoped for at this point.”

Another 7,000 volunteers, Carter said, were going through the screening process.

Last year, Congress approved $500 million for training program, with a goal of training about 3,000 vetted Syrian rebels this year, according to the Congressional Research Service.

There are many reasons why the number of vetted fighters is so low, including the Obama administration’s requirement that the fighters — who are being trained at sites in Turkey, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Qatar — agree to prioritize the fight against ISIL over the war against the Assad regime.

Administration officials are concerned about the aftermath if Assad were toppled without a political structure ready to replace him. But McCain and other Republicans say it’s imperative that the administration go after both the Syrian leader and ISIL.

“The administration is telling Syrians to forego fighting their greatest enemy, the Assad regime, which is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of innocent people, and meanwhile refusing to protect these fighters from the terror of Assad’s barrel bombs,” McCain said in a statement. “That is why it is no small wonder that our train and equip program in Syria is so anemic.”

For his part, Carter predicted during Tuesday’s hearing that more allied fighters will be vetted and trained.

“As training progresses,” he said, “we are learning more about the opposition groups and building important relationships, which increases our ability to attract recruits and provides valuable intelligence for counter-ISIL operations.”

A separate, classified program to train Syrian rebels run by the CIA, reportedly to the tune of nearly $1 billion, has been underway for several years. Its effectiveness has also been called into question, leading some lawmakers to move to cut some of the secret funding.


Your Priorities, Not War

May 12, 2015

by Paul Kawika Martin

It’s that time of year when Congress figures out the federal budget for next year. The House will take up the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) this week. Despite the Republican stranglehold in the House they may allow a few amendments to be voted on where we can make a difference.

Please call your Representative now at 202-224-3121 and ask them to support amendments to the NDAA that cut Pentagon spending and cut the OCO slush fund.

You’ve heard us talk about the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account. It is supposed to be used to fund the U.S. wars abroad that we oppose. The Republicans and, to a lesser extent, the Obama administration has been using it as a slush fund to cover costs for programs the Pentagon would otherwise be forced to cut. Indeed, the Republicans almost doubled the account to nearly $100 billion at a time when the war in Afghanistan is supposed to be winding down.

This week, Congress may vote on amendments to slash the OCO, make the slush fund more transparent, or both. Additionally, House amendments might address various Pentagon boondoggles like the wasteful F-35 and unneeded nuclear weapons.

This is not how we want our hard earned tax dollars spent. Pick up your phone now and call your Representative, 202-224-3121, and tell them to slash the OCO slush fund and cut Pentagon pork like the F-35 and nuclear weapons.


Might Doesn’t Make Right (or even get a country what it wants)

May 12, 2014

With his essay “What you need to tell people when they say we should use the military,” Peace Action Board Member Larry Wittner makes a very succinct and persuasive case on History News Network that military might, especially as wielded by the United States, achieves little in international relations.

tags: Military Power

 2  1  14 

 

 

Dr. Lawrence Wittner (http://lawrenceswittner.com) is Professor of History emeritus at SUNY/Albany. His latest book is a satirical novel about university corporatization and rebellion, “What’s Going On at UAardvark?

SIPRI Fact Sheet:  TRENDS IN WORLD MILITARY EXPENDITURE, 2013

Is overwhelming national military power a reliable source of influence in world affairs?

If so, the United States should certainly have plenty of influence today. For decades, it has been the world’s Number 1 military spender. And it continues in this role. According to a recent report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, the United States spent $640 billion on the military in 2013, thus accounting for 37 percent of world military expenditures. The two closest competitors, China and Russia, accounted for 11 percent and 5 percent respectively. Thus, last year, the United States spent more than three times as much as China and more than seven times as much as Russia on the military.

In this context, the U.S. government’s inability to get its way in world affairs is striking. In the current Ukraine crisis, the Russian government does not seem at all impressed by the U.S. government’s strong opposition to its behavior. Also, the Chinese government, ignoring Washington’s protests, has laid out ambitious territorial claims in the East and South China Seas. Even much smaller, weaker nations have been snubbing the advice of U.S. officials. Israel has torpedoed U.S. attempts to forge an Israeli-Palestinian peace settlement, the embattled Syrian government has been unwilling to negotiate a transfer of power, and North Korea remains as obdurate as ever when it comes to scuttling its nuclear weapons program.

Of course, hawkish critics of the Obama administration say that it lacks influence in these cases because it is unwilling to use the U.S. government’s vast military power in war.

But is this true? The Obama administration channeled very high levels of military manpower and financial resources into lengthy U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and ended up with precious little to show for this investment. Furthermore, in previous decades, the U.S. government used its overwhelming military power in a number of wars without securing its goals. The bloody Korean War, for example, left things much as they were before the conflict began, with the Korean peninsula divided and a ruthless dictatorship in place in the north. The lengthy and costly Vietnam War led to a humiliating defeat for the United States — not because the U.S. government lacked enormous military advantages, but because, ultimately, the determination of the Vietnamese to gain control of their own country proved more powerful than U.S. weaponry.

Even CIA ventures drawing upon U.S. military power have produced a very mixed result. Yes, the CIA, bolstered by U.S. military equipment, managed to overthrow the Guatemalan government in 1954. But, seven years later, the CIA-directed, -funded, and -equipped invasion at Cuba’s Bay of Pigs failed to topple the Castro government when the Cuban public failed to rally behind the U.S.-instigated effort. Although the U.S. government retains an immense military advantage over its Cuban counterpart, with which it retains a hostile relationship, this has not secured the United States any observable influence over Cuban policy.

The Cold War confrontation between the U.S. and Soviet governments is particularly instructive. For decades, the two governments engaged in an arms race, with the United States clearly in the lead. But the U.S. military advantage did not stop the Soviet government from occupying Eastern Europe, crushing uprisings against Soviet domination in Hungary and Czechoslovakia, or dispatching Soviet troops to take control of Afghanistan. Along the way, U.S. hawks sometimes called for war with the Soviet Union. But, in fact, U.S. and Soviet military forces never clashed. What finally produced a love fest between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev and ended the Cold War was a strong desire by both sides to replace confrontation with cooperation, as indicated by the signing of substantial nuclear disarmament agreements.

Similarly, the Iranian and U.S. governments, which have been on the worst of terms for decades, appear to be en route to resolving their tense standoff — most notably over the possible development of Iranian nuclear weapons — through diplomacy. It remains unclear if this momentum toward a peaceful settlement results from economic sanctions or from the advent of a reformist leadership in Tehran. But there is no evidence that U.S. military power, which has always been far greater than Iran’s, has played a role in fostering it.

Given this record, perhaps military enthusiasts in the United States and other nations should consider whether military power is a reliable source of influence in world affairs. After all, just because you possess a hammer doesn’t mean that every problem you face is a nail.

– See more at: http://hnn.us/article/155550#sthash.YqVs3dTk.dpuf


Move the Money, Crush the Slush Fund

May 3, 2014

Over 70 U.S. events and actions were held to mark Tax Day and the 4th Global Day of Action on Military Spending (GDAMS).  As you probably know, Peace Action was the US coordinator of GDAMS events for the 2nd year running.

With the 2014 elections just six months away, PAEF’s campaign to Move the Money from the Pentagon to our communities has never been more prominent in the national discourse.

Members of both parties in Congress are exploring military cuts as part of efforts to reduce deficits.  Predictably, vested interests are working overtime to preserve, and even increase where possible, the current, historically high, levels of military spending.

On Thursday, the Washington Post reported the costs of major weapons acquisitions, like the F-35, have risen $500 billion above their orignial projected costs.  Congress loudly denounce cost overruns even as they look for ways to increase Pentagon funding.

Peace Action has renewed its fight against one of the ways the Pentagon hopes will permit it to restore funding for items left out – for the moment – to keep the Pentagon under budget control limits.  For example, Congress could allow the Pentagon to use funds from the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), meant to fund military operations in Afghanistan, to restore eight F-35’s left out of the President’s budget.  The Pentagon has used the OCO as a slush fund to reduce Pentagon cuts this year to just $3.5 billion dollars while domestic spending was slashed by $15 billion – not exactly the shared pain sequestration was supposed to deliver.

Working with our allies, Peace Action is circulating a sign-on letter to Members of Congress from a host of organizations working in our Move the Money coalitions reminding them that: “According to the Pentagon, from FY 2013 to FY 2014, approximately 39 percent fewer personnel will be deployed to Afghanistan (with none in Iraq). Yet, in the FY 2014 omnibus spending bill, Defense Subcommittee funding in the OCO account will actually increase from FY 2013 to FY 2014.”

Call your Senators and Representative and tell them the Overseas Contingency Operations should not be used as a slush fund for runaway Pentagon spending.  Call the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.


Diplomacy advocate lectures congregation

September 26, 2013

The Island Now
Thursday, September 26, 2013
By Bill San Antonio

As the executive director of Peace Action, the nation’s largest grassroots disarmament organization, Kevin Martin said Tuesday he has seen firsthand the militarization of the United States’ foreign policy in the last decade.

But in his lecture at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation entitled “Endless War on Peace,” Martin said he was confident that America’s recent history of military strikes and occupations of nations seen as a threat to national security would evolve into a more diplomatic approach to foreign policy – particularly because of the recent diplomatic efforts to eliminate Syria’s chemical weapons and the start of talks with Iran.

“At a certain point, we’re just not going to buy that anymore,” Martin said. “We’re just not going to buy that there’s a terrorist at every corner of the globe.”

Martin began the lecture, which was sponsored by the Shelter Rock Forum, the Great Neck SANE/Peace Action and the Long Island Alliance for Peaceful Alternatives, by calling out the names of 11 nations — China, Russia, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Saudi Arabia, India, Germany, Italy, Brazil and South Korea – whose combined military budgets equals what the United States spends on its own military each year.

But for all its spending, Martin said the United States is ranked No. 99 on the Global Peace Index, tied with Papua New Guinea despite being known as the world’s last superpower.

“We can’t keep doing this, we can’t keep marauding around the world and trying to kill more terrorists than we create, because we will fail,” Martin said.

Martin said the U.S. spends approximately $600 billion each year on its military and $1 trillion on national security, and in the next 10 years will implement a $200 million arms refurbishment program.

“How do we have any credibility going to Iran or anyone else, saying they shouldn’t have weapons of mass destruction, shouldn’t have nuclear weapons, when we not only intend to keep ours, we intend to modernize them?” Martin said.

Martin also cited a University of Massachusetts study that said military spending is the worst way to create jobs and stimulate the economy, adding that the money America puts toward military spending could better serve the job market if it were used on education.

“Military spending does not help our economy in any way other than keep people employed,” Martin said. “If you can separate the nonsense about the economic benefits of military spending from the real security issues we have in this country, we can win that argument.”

Martin said the mainstream media has more recently played a role in more diplomatic measures in America’s foreign policy.

With Syria, Martin said the mainstream media took greater interest in covering the different angles toward President Obama’s recent request to Congress for a military strike on Syria after those who have been known to be pro-war were coming out against the strike.

Within a day or two, Martin said the media began covering what he called “better alternatives” to avoid the strike, such as sending supplies and weapons to those who are fighting off the Syrian army and rebel fighters who may have ties to terrorist organizations.

“That’s when I knew Obama was sunk, because he could try to scare us or try some fandango, but once better alternatives were out there, he lost control of the conversation,” Martin said.

Martin added that there could be a “spillover effect” from the diplomatic solution toward America’s approach to Syria that could impact future negotiations with Iran over the destabilization of its nuclear program.

“Now diplomacy seems like this limb we’ve learned to use again,” Martin said.

Martin said he does not think major arms manufacturers will continue to have a strong influence in lobbying the federal government into increased military spending, if better alternatives continue to present themselves in America’s foreign policy and people continue pushing for peace.

“If peace actually breaks out, you just can’t justify using such a huge percentage of our tax dollars on tanks and missiles and that $200 million over the next 10 years to refurbish our weapons,” Martin said. “You just can’t justify that anymore.”

If the United States opted for diplomacy more frequently, Martin said the short-term effect would be that other countries would fear and hate the United States less, though its history of invasions and military attacks would likely mean it would take longer for the world to “love us more.”

But the process of healing America’s reputation around the world starts with money coming out of the “war machine” and being put toward more “life-affirming functions,” and for people to “stand up for the values this country says its for” and be more vocal about a peaceful and diplomatic foreign policy, Martin said.

“We have hope, we have real solutions, we have better alternatives, we have better policies,” Martin said. “They have a lot of money and guns and weapons, but really all they have is fear.”


Results of House National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Amendments

June 13, 2013

Please click here for results of NDAA.

Amendments should be debated in the order listed below, though some will not be debated and voted “en bloc” (a bunch of amendments voted in one vote together that will pass).  Also, because of some members schedules they might debate out of order.  The only other votes scheduled which should include amendments should start around 3:00 end around 6:00 PM and debate will continue late into the evening.  They will reconvene at 9:00 AM on Friday with some likely votes and try to end by 3:00 PM.

Call your Representative at 877-429-0678 (Thanks to FCNL for number) and say:

I would like Rep. XXX to vote against the National Defense Authorization Act and support amendment #10 to end the Afghanistan war, amendment #32 to cut Pentagon budget by $60 Billion and any other amendment that reduces Pentagon spending.

You may be interested in the letter we sent to Congress.  Feel free to forward to your Member of Congress.

Dear Congressional Staffer,

The National Defense Authorization Act of 2014 is $54 billion above what current law (Budget Control Act) allows.  It continues funding the war in Afghanistan ,which we think should end as soon as possible.  During tough budgetary times, this bloated bill takes from important domestic programs.  Hence, on behalf of our over 100,000 paid members, Peace Action is opposing the bill as a whole and urges a no vote.

Notwithstanding our opposition to the bill, we have vote recommendations on various amendments listed below.  These votes may be used for our yearly voting record and as considerations for endorsements.

We look forward to hearing on how your boss plans on voting.

Sincerely,

Paul Kawika Martin

Political Director

Peace Action

pmartin@peace-action.org

Peace Action Position on Selected Amendments to NDAA 2014

Floor #, Orig #, Sponsors, Summary, Peace Action Position

2 #222 Blumenauer (OR) , Mulvaney (SC), Bentivolio, (MI)   Reduces from 11 to 10 the statutory requirement for the number of operational carriers that the U.S. Navy must have.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

3 #115 Lummis (WY), Daines (MT), Cramer, Kevin (ND)   Requires DOD to preserve currently active ICBM silos in warm status.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

10 #118 McGovern (MA) , Jones (NC), Smith, Adam (WA), Lee, Barbara (CA), Garamendi (CA) Revised  Requires the President to complete the accelerated transition of combat operations from U.S. Armed Forces to the Government of Afghanistan no later than by the end of 2013; the accelerated transition of military and security operations by the end of 2014, including the redeployment of U.S. troops; and to pursue robust negotiations to address Afghanistan’s and the region’s security and stability. Establishes the sense of Congress that should the President determine the necessity for post-2014 deployment of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, the Congress should vote to authorize such a presence and mission by no later than June 2014.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

11 #196 Goodlatte (VA) Requires the government, in habeas proceedings for United States citizens apprehended in the United States pursuant to the AUMF, to prove by clear and convincing evidence that the citizen is an unprivileged enemy combatant and there is not presumption that the government’s evidence is accurate and authentic.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

12 #71 Radel, Trey (FL) , Amash (MI), Massie (KY), Salmon, (AZ) Requires the Department of Defense to submit to the Congress a report every year containing: (1) the names of any U.S. citizens subject to military detention, (2) the legal justification for their continued detention, and (3) the steps the Executive Branch is taking to either provide them some judicial process, or release them. Requires that an unclassified version of the report be made available, and in addition, that the report must be made available to all members of Congress.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

13 #73 Smith, Adam (WA) , Gibson (NY) Amends Section 1021 of the FY2012 National Defense Authorization Act to eliminate   indefinite military detention of any person detained under AUMF authority in the United States, territories or possessions by providing immediate transfer to trial and proceedings by a court established under Article III of the Constitution or by an appropriate state court. Strikes section 1022 of the same Act (which provided for mandatory military custody of covered parties).  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

18 #43 Radel, Trey (FL) , Amash (MI), Massie (KY), Salmon, (AZ) Prohibits the use of lethal military force, including the use of unmanned aircrafts, against U.S. citizens on U.S. soil, absent narrow exceptions for imminent and significant national security threats.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

19 #23 Walorski, Jackie (IN) Prohibits the Secretary of Defense from using any funds authorized to the department for the transfer or release of Guantanamo detainees to Yemen.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

20 #74 Smith, Adam (WA) , Moran, James (VA), Nadler (NY) Provides framework to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by December 1, 2014 PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

21 #19 Turner (OH) Requires the President of the United States to convey to Congress the details of any proposed deals with the Russian Federation concerning the missile defense or nuclear arms of the United States.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

22 #40 Holt (NJ) Strikes all of subtitle C of title II except section 237 (Iron Dome program).  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

23 #217 Polis (CO) Revised  Limits funding for advanced procurement of inefficient ground-based interceptor rocket motor sets, and the costly refurbishment of Missile Field 1 at Fort Greely, Alaska, until the Secretary of Defense makes certain certifications to Congress, including that the Commander of the United States Northern Command has full confidence in the homeland missile defense system.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

25 #21 McCollum (MN) Prohibits any funds authorized in the bill from being used to sponsor Army National Guard professional wrestling sports sponsorships or motor sports sponsorships. The amendment does not prohibit recruiters from making direct, personal contact with secondary school students and other prospective recruits.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

32 #91 Nolan (MN) Reduces total funds authorized in this Act by $60 Billion.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

33 #136 Cooper (TN) Reinstates the New START funding.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

36 #132 Gibson (NY) , Garamendi (CA) Strikes section 1251, Sense of Congress on the Conflict in Syria.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

37 #210 Coffman (CO) , Griffith (VA), Polis (CO), Blumenauer (OR) Directs the President of the United States to end the permanent basing of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (2CR) in Vilseck, Germany and return the Brigade Combat Team currently stationed in Europe to the United States, without permanent replacement, leaving one Brigade Combat Team and one Combat Aviation Brigade–nothing in this amendment should be construed as directing the removal of Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, nor certain quick-reaction forces.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

39 #247 Van Hollen, Chris (MD) , Moran, James (VA), Mulvaney (SC), Woodall (GA) Revised  Matches the President’s budget request for Overseas Contingency Operations.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

104 #198 Conyers (MI) Clarifies that the assessment mandated in Section 1036(3) includes associated forces that are engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners for purposes of interpreting the scope of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

106 #101 Braley (IA) , Jones (NC) Directs the President to submit to Congress a report on the long-term costs of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation New Dawn, and Operation Enduring Freedom in Iraq and Afghanistan.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

116 #17 Lewis, John (GA) Require the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service and the Director of the Bureau of Economic Analysis, to post to cost of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to each American taxpayer on the Department of Defense’s website.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

122 #273 Lynch (MA) Requires an assessment of the Afghan National Security Force’s (ANSF) ability to provide proper Operations & Maintenance for U.S.-funded ANSF infrastructure projects after January 1, 2015.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

124 #274 Johnson, Hank (GA) , Lee, Barbara (CA) Prohibits funding to construct permanent military bases in Afghanistan.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

134 #63 Rigell (VA) Reaffirms Congress’ constitutional war powers by clearly stating that nothing in this Act shall be construed to authorize any use of military force.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

129 #120 Ros-Lehtinen   (FL) Authorizes the Secretary of Defense to deploy assets, personnel and resources to the   Joint Interagency Task Force South, in coordination with SOUTHCOM, to combat transnational criminal organization, drug trafficking, bulk shipments of narcotics or currency, narco-terrorism, human trafficking and the Iranian presence in SOUTHCOM’s AOR.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

135 #114 Ellison (MN) Prohibits the authorization of Defense Department funds for tear gas and other riot control items to Middle East and North African countries undergoing democratic transition unless the Secretary of Defense certifies to the appropriate Congressional committees that the security forces of such countries are not using excessive force to repress peaceful, lawful and organized dissent.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

136 #261 Broun (GA) Prohibits the Department of Defense from using a drone to kill a citizen of the United States unless they are actively engaged in combat against the United States.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

137 #168 DeLauro (CT) , Granger (TX), Moran, James (VA), Kingston (GA), Ellison (MN), Wolf (VA), Connolly (VA)

Bi-Partisan

Prohibits the Defense Department from continuing to purchase equipment from the Russian arms dealer Rosoboronexport unless the Secretary of Defense certifies that the firm is cooperating with a Defense Contract Audit Agency audit, not delivering S-300 missile defense batteries to Syria, and that no new contracts have been signed by the firm with Syria since January 1, 2013. Provides a national security waiver with a requirement that the Secretary justify the waiver in a report to Congress 30 days prior to the purchase of any equipment from Rosoboronexport.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

138 #185 Connolly (VA) , Granger (TX), Diaz-Balart, Mario (FL), Gingrey (GA), Sires (NJ), Carter (TX)   Directs the President to sell 66 F-16 C/D aircraft to Taiwan.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

139 #249 Roskam (IL) Requires the President to submit to the appropriate committees every 90 days a report that identifies that the United States has taken all necessary steps to ensure that Israel possesses and maintains an independent capability to remove existential threats to its security and defend its vital national interests.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

144 #55 Gosar (AZ) States that Congress fully supports Israel’s lawful exercise of self-defense, including actions to halt regional aggression.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

146 #197 Conyers (MI) , Jones (NC), Johnson, Hank (GA), Ellison (MN) Clarifies that nothing in the bill shall be construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

147 #30 Walorski, Jackie (IN) , Lamborn (CO) Expresses the sense of Congress in support of fully implementing U.S. and international sanctions on Iran. Reiterates that it is U.S. policy to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon capability, and declares that the U.S. has a vital national interest in the survival and security of the State of Israel.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

148 #228 Fortenberry (NE) Directs the Secretary of Defense to establish a strategy to modernize the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program in order to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and related materials in the Middle East and North Africa region.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS

168 #96 Franks (AZ) Establishes the sense of Congress that the paramount security concern of the United States is the ongoing and illegal nuclear weapons programs of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.  PEACE ACTION OPPOSES

170 #239 Garamendi (CA) Withholds the $2.6 billion dollars in additional funding that have been added to the Afghan National Security Forces Fund this year for acquisition of aircraft, vehicles and other equipment until the Secretary of Defense submits a report to Congress confirming when these systems would be delivered, the ANSF’s capabilities of operating and maintaining these systems, and the impact of such acquisitions on the future US costs of funding the ANSF.  PEACE ACTION SUPPORTS


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