Largest Peace Group Endorses Sanders

February 10, 2016

 

Washington, DC — February 10, 2016 — For the first time in nearly 25 years, Peace Action PAC, the political action committee of Peace Action (the largest peace group in the U.S.) has endorsed a candidate for President:  Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) for the Democratic primary.

“Peace Action PAC is proud to endorse Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) for the Democratic presidential primary.  With Sanders’ opposition to both Iraq Wars, support for the significant reduction of nuclear weapons, endorsement of the Iran agreement, championing the reduction of Pentagon spending and general support of diplomacy over war, he best represents the values that Peace Action and its 200,000 supporters have espoused for nearly 60 years,” said Kevin Martin, Peace Action’s executive director.

The organization has a high-bar for presidential endorsements requiring the agreement of two-thirds of its board of directors.  Before the board voted, it polled its supporters, and Sanders received 85% support.  The Sanders endorsement easily passed with near unanimity.

“Sanders opposed the proposed Syria airstrikes in 2013, sending arms to Syrian rebels, and military escalation in the region with U.S. special ops forces.  His clear preference to find alternatives to costly, ineffectual and many times backfiring military intervention, making him deserving of Peace Action PAC’s rare endorsement,” added Paul Kawika Martin, Peace Action PAC’s director.

In support of Sanders’ low donor campaign, Peace Action asks its supporters to donate here:

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About Peace Action:

Founded in 1957, Peace Action (formerly SANE/Freeze), the United States’ largest peace and disarmament organization, with over 100,000 paid members and nearly 100 chapters in 36 states, works to abolish nuclear weapons, promote government spending priorities that support human needs, encourage real security through international cooperation and human rights and support nonmilitary solutions to the conflicts with Afghanistan and Iran. The public may learn more and take action at http://www.Peace- Action.org. For more up-to-date peace insider information, follow Peace Action’s political director on Twitter. http://twitter.com/PaulKawika

Notes to Editors:

For a more reasons why Peace Action PAC endorsed Sanders:

Top 5 Reasons Peace Action PAC is Endorsing Bernie Sanders for President

Top 5 Reasons Peace Action PAC is Endorsing Bernie Sanders for President

By Kevin Martin, Executive Director, Peace Action & Jon Rainwater, Executive Director, Peace Action West

After 15 years of war, the next president of the United States will inherit daunting foreign policy challenges. Sadly, many of those challenges were fueled by an “act first, think later” U.S. military policy in places like Iraq and Libya that has backfired. At the same time, the new president will need to sustain diplomatic initiatives started by President Obama including the Iranian nuclear deal and peace talks to end the Syria war.

We need a president that can cultivate diplomatic openings while turning the country away from an over-reliance on the blunt military instrument. Bernie Sanders has vocally opposed this military-first foreign policy and the sprawling quagmire the U.S. is enmeshed in. That’s why Peace Action PAC is endorsing Senator Bernie Sanders for President in the Democratic primary.

Sanders didn’t just get the Iraq war vote right. Then and now, he’s had the foresight to predict the dangers of a military-first foreign policy.

Bernie Sanders has been a leading voice in Congress against risky U.S. military adventurism. Sanders was prescient in describing the pitfalls of the Iraq war that so many of his colleagues were blind to. Sanders predicted the high cost of the war for the U.S. in terms of lives and wasted resources. He had the foresight to accurately predict that a U.S. invasion of Iraq could lead to sectarian conflict and he argued that the ensuing chaos could support the rise of extremism.

Sanders has continued to point out when blunt military tools only make the complex conflicts in the Middle East worse. He opposed plans to bomb Syria over concerns about chemical weapons use. He voted against the disgraced program to arm “moderate” Syrian rebels that resulted in some U.S.-trained rebels taking their weapons stockpiles and joining the ranks of extremists.

Sanders now opposes sending U.S. ground troops to Syria and warns of a potential quagmire. There are already roughly 6,000 Americans involved in the fighting in Iraq and Syria and most of the leading presidential candidates are calling for more. Sanders also opposes the proposed “no-fly-zone” in Syria which many experts feel would endanger civilians while risking a direct conflict with Russia that could spiral out of control.

Sanders supports a truly diplomacy-first foreign policy

Sanders is not afraid to take bold positions on behalf of diplomacy and conflict resolution. He was a vocal and visible leader in the debate about the Iran nuclear deal and forcefully rebutted the deal’s critics like Benjamin Netanyahu. Now, like President Obama, he wants to build on the Iran deal to help reduce tensions in the Middle East. Recently, when Sanders expressed cautious optimism about normalized relations with Iran he was immediately pounced on by opponents as naive  —  despite the fact that allies like Canada and Europe are eagerly moving towards economic and diplomatic normalization with Iran. We need someone who can seize and sustain diplomatic openings.

Sanders has articulated a much more cautious approach to regime change and military intervention than the other leading candidates for president. In the run up to the Gulf War (1991) and the Iraq War (2002) he pushed for a diplomatic resolution. He is also resisting the growing saber rattling and talk of a new Cold War by some U.S. and Russian politicians. Sanders instead calls for a diplomatic approach to the conflict in Eastern Europe.

Sanders’s campaign is also making a critical strategic point that the country needs to hear: If the military fight against extremism in the Middle East continues to be led by the U.S., the extremists’ recruitment narrative  —  and thereby their lasting power  —  is strengthened. In the long run that makes us all less safe. Most experts agree that only political and diplomatic solutions can bring stability to Iraq, Syria and Libya. But Sanders is the rare elected official willing to resist the climate of fear that leads to band-aid military tactics. He instead champions the tools that can really keep us safer.

Sanders is taking on Pentagon bloat

Bernie Sanders is one of the leading voices in Congress in the fight against wasteful Pentagon spending. He has opposed the special war-funding account that is being used as a “slush fund” for the Pentagon. He’s repeatedly pointed out that the Pentagon’s out of control spending is based on Cold War era military thinking and weapons systems. Sanders also points out that the Pentagon budget is so mismanaged that the Pentagon is unable to say where they actually spend all their money.

Sanders knows that diplomacy, humanitarian aid, and economic development are often more effective security building tools than military intervention. He’s pushed to reform security spending by cutting wasteful Pentagon weapons systems and foreign arms transfers to increase spending for programs that work to prevent conflict and build stability.

Getting Big Money out of our politics is as important for a progressive foreign policy as for domestic priorities. Economic fairness and truly secure communities are linked.

Sanders is the only candidate challenging the power of the military-industrial complex and their campaign contributions. Pentagon industry insiders are reaping record profits for weapons systems that aren’t needed given our real twenty-first century security needs. Meanwhile other needs that also contribute to real security for U.S. communities are starved for funds.

Sanders has smart, concrete proposals for an accessible education system; for fixing our crumbling infrastructure; for investments in clean energy and a healthy of the environment; and for a strong, resilient universal health care system. In the twenty-first century these things are part of what makes our communities truly safe and secure. It will be very difficult to fund those proposals without taking on entrenched interests that benefit from a military budget that currently gobbles up half of discretionary expenditures.

“I would ask all of my colleagues to remember what Eisenhower said [about how the military-industrial complex robs from social investments] and understand that today, when we have this bloated and huge military budget, there are people who are talking about massive cuts in food stamps, massive cuts in education, massive cuts in affordable housing, cuts in Social Security, cuts in Medicare, cuts in Medicaid. I would argue very strongly that before we cut from the elderly and the children and the sick and the poor, maybe we take a hard look at this bloated military budget.”

—  Bernie Sanders on the floor of the U.S. Senate, December 2013

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Top 5 Reasons Peace Action PAC is Endorsing Bernie Sanders for President

February 10, 2016

supporters

By Kevin Martin, Executive Director, Peace Action & Jon Rainwater, Executive Director, Peace Action West

After 15 years of war, the next president of the United States will inherit daunting foreign policy challenges. Sadly, many of those challenges were fueled by an “act first, think later” U.S. military policy in places like Iraq and Libya that has backfired. At the same time, the new president will need to sustain diplomatic initiatives started by President Obama including the Iranian nuclear deal and peace talks to end the Syria war.

We need a president that can cultivate diplomatic openings while turning the country away from an over-reliance on the blunt military instrument. Bernie Sanders has vocally opposed this military-first foreign policy and the sprawling quagmire the U.S. is enmeshed in. That’s why Peace Action PAC is endorsing Senator Bernie Sanders for President in the Democratic primary.

Sanders didn’t just get the Iraq war vote right. Then and now, he’s had the foresight to predict the dangers of a military-first foreign policy.

Bernie Sanders has been a leading voice in Congress against risky U.S. military adventurism. Sanders was prescient in describing the pitfalls of the Iraq war that so many of his colleagues were blind to. Sanders predicted the high cost of the war for the U.S. in terms of lives and wasted resources. He had the foresight to accurately predict that a U.S. invasion of Iraq could lead to sectarian conflict and he argued that the ensuing chaos could support the rise of extremism.

Sanders has continued to point out when blunt military tools only make the complex conflicts in the Middle East worse. He opposed plans to bomb Syria over concerns about chemical weapons use. He voted against the disgraced program to arm “moderate” Syrian rebels that resulted in some U.S.-trained rebels taking their weapons stockpiles and joining the ranks of extremists.

Sanders now opposes sending U.S. ground troops to Syria and warns of a potential quagmire. There are already roughly 6,000 Americans involved in the fighting in Iraq and Syria and most of the leading presidential candidates are calling for more. Sanders also opposes the proposed “no-fly-zone” in Syria which many experts feel would endanger civilians while risking a direct conflict with Russia that could spiral out of control.

Sanders supports a truly diplomacy-first foreign policy

Sanders is not afraid to take bold positions on behalf of diplomacy and conflict resolution. He was a vocal and visible leader in the debate about the Iran nuclear deal and forcefully rebutted the deal’s critics like Benjamin Netanyahu. Now, like President Obama, he wants to build on the Iran deal to help reduce tensions in the Middle East. Recently, when Sanders expressed cautious optimism about normalized relations with Iran he was immediately pounced on by opponents as naive  —  despite the fact that allies like Canada and Europe are eagerly moving towards economic and diplomatic normalization with Iran. We need someone who can seize and sustain diplomatic openings.

Sanders has articulated a much more cautious approach to regime change and military intervention than the other leading candidates for president. In the run up to the Gulf War (1991) and the Iraq War (2002) he pushed for a diplomatic resolution. He is also resisting the growing saber rattling and talk of a new Cold War by some U.S. and Russian politicians. Sanders instead calls for a diplomatic approach to the conflict in Eastern Europe.

Sanders’s campaign is also making a critical strategic point that the country needs to hear: If the military fight against extremism in the Middle East continues to be led by the U.S., the extremists’ recruitment narrative  —  and thereby their lasting power  —  is strengthened. In the long run that makes us all less safe. Most experts agree that only political and diplomatic solutions can bring stability to Iraq, Syria and Libya. But Sanders is the rare elected official willing to resist the climate of fear that leads to band-aid military tactics. He instead champions the tools that can really keep us safer.

Sanders is taking on Pentagon bloat

Bernie Sanders is one of the leading voices in Congress in the fight against wasteful Pentagon spending. He has opposed the special war-funding account that is being used as a “slush fund” for the Pentagon. He’s repeatedly pointed out that the Pentagon’s out of control spending is based on Cold War era military thinking and weapons systems. Sanders also points out that the Pentagon budget is so mismanaged that the Pentagon is unable to say where they actually spend all their money.

Sanders knows that diplomacy, humanitarian aid, and economic development are often more effective security building tools than military intervention. He’s pushed to reform security spending by cutting wasteful Pentagon weapons systems and foreign arms transfers to increase spending for programs that work to prevent conflict and build stability.

Getting Big Money out of our politics is as important for a progressive foreign policy as for domestic priorities. Economic fairness and truly secure communities are linked.

Sanders is the only candidate challenging the power of the military-industrial complex and their campaign contributions. Pentagon industry insiders are reaping record profits for weapons systems that aren’t needed given our real twenty-first century security needs. Meanwhile other needs that also contribute to real security for U.S. communities are starved for funds.

Sanders has smart, concrete proposals for an accessible education system; for fixing our crumbling infrastructure; for investments in clean energy and a healthy of the environment; and for a strong, resilient universal health care system. In the twenty-first century these things are part of what makes our communities truly safe and secure. It will be very difficult to fund those proposals without taking on entrenched interests that benefit from a military budget that currently gobbles up half of discretionary expenditures.

“I would ask all of my colleagues to remember what Eisenhower said [about how the military-industrial complex robs from social investments] and understand that today, when we have this bloated and huge military budget, there are people who are talking about massive cuts in food stamps, massive cuts in education, massive cuts in affordable housing, cuts in Social Security, cuts in Medicare, cuts in Medicaid. I would argue very strongly that before we cut from the elderly and the children and the sick and the poor, maybe we take a hard look at this bloated military budget.”

—  Bernie Sanders on the floor of the U.S. Senate, December 2013

In support of Sanders’ low donor campaign, Peace Action asks its supporters to donate here:


Peace Action Applauds Iran Agreement Success; Urges Similar Diplomatic Efforts with Syria and North Korea

January 16, 2016

Peace Action Applauds Iran Agreement Success; Urges Similar Diplomatic Efforts with Syria and North Korea

Washington, DC — January 16, 2016 — In response to today’s announcement that all parties (The United States, Russia, China, United Kingdom, and France, plus Germany — the P5 + 1), including Iran, have implemented their responsibilities under the agreement reached last July 14 that has significantly rolled back Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for lifting international sanctions against the country, Paul Kawika Martin the policy and political director of Peace Action (the largest peace group in the U.S. founded on abolishing nuclear weapons) who has been working on the Iran issue for over eight years and had the rare opportunity to spend time in Iran and enjoyed hospitality from its people and its vast culture, made the following statement:

“Successful diplomacy has moved Iran from a possible timeline of a few months to over a year away from having the fissile material needed to make a crude nuclear weapon if it so chose.  This historic agreement, now implemented, makes the U.S. and the world a safer place.

“The implementation of the agreement proves that diplomacy works.  Instead of isolation, sanctions that don’t affect leaders or military intervention that costs vast amounts of blood and treasure and untold long-term costs and unintended consequences, the U.S. used dialogue, negotiations and the international community to solve conflict.

“The U.S. should continue to use diplomacy with Iran to tackle issues like human rights and regional security that will further reduce Middle East tensions.

“Additionally, we should take lessons learned and continue diplomacy to bring about a cease-fire within Syria and finalize a political solution to end its civil war.

“In particular, the U.S should heed its success of negotiating with Iran without preconditions to re-enter into six-party talks with North Korea and drop its demand of preconditions for continued dialogue.

“Lastly, this success shows that excessive Pentagon spending needs to be replaced with more diplomatic tools to solve international conflicts without the horrendous costs of military intervention.”

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Founded in 1957, Peace Action (formerly SANE/Freeze), the United States’ largest peace and disarmament organization, with over 100,000 paid members and nearly 100 chapters in 36 states, works to abolish nuclear weapons, promote government spending priorities that support human needs, encourage real security through international cooperation and human rights and support nonmilitary solutions to the conflicts with Afghanistan and Iran. The public may learn more and take action at http://www.Peace- Action.org. For more up-to-date peace insider information, follow Peace Action’s political director on Twitter. http://twitter.com/PaulKawika


Friday Reading Recommendations

January 15, 2016

Geneseo chapter

A few succinct, powerful articles for you from friends of Peace Action:

Code Pink founder and Peace Action Advisory Board member Medea Benjamin on 10 good things about 2015

Korea Peace Network co-founder and Peace Action Advisory Board member Christine Ahn on bringing peace and reconciliation to Korea in the wake of the North Korean nuclear test

The always spot-on Walden Bello on Trump, the ultimate blowback of US foreign policy

Longtime Peace Action supporter Jeff Smith: Where are the peace candidates? (and it’s not just about politics)

The first three articles are from the terrific web publication Foreign Policy in Focus, please consider subscribing to this free weekly journal, it’s chock full of news and views you can use each week!


Making Connections

December 10, 2015

It’s been a tough year for our planet.  As it draws to a close, let me make my case for your continued financial support.

Peace Actions’s community-based, frontline organizers provide issue briefings to congressional candidates and meet often with elected representatives and their staff. They also meet with local editorial boards to educate opinion leaders on both the alternatives to the endless war on terror, and the urgent need to address other, real threats to our planet; accelerating climate disaster, nuclear weapons, poverty and disease and the continuous assault on civil rights.

Peace Action’s strategy of coalition building has broadened the peace movement. We work cooperatively and effectively with a large peace and disarmament community nationwide and make the connections between energy policy and resource war, war and the destruction of the global environment and militarism and the cost to our economic well being, in the process, bringing new voices to peace work.

Peace Action works with an international peace movement, and has for decades, building alliances, coordinating message and actions, and pushing the U.S. and its allies to embrace the adage, “there is no way to peace, peace is the way.”

Together, our organization, members like you, our chapters and associates, staff and volunteers are working to advance a vision of the future where the human race is no longer preparing to do battle over what is left of the world’s resources. It’s a vision of the future I think we all share, when diplomacy, partnership and multi-lateral cooperation become the foundation of a collective security that will allow us to work together to meet the urgent global human needs that challenge all of us.

As you consider your year-end giving options, please choose to support the work of Peace Action and Peace Action Education Fund.

Thank you for all your support for Peace Action’s work. On behalf of our staff and Board of Directors, let me wish the very best to you and those you love.


Budget Deal Reached, Pentagon Gives Thanks

November 13, 2015

After years of gridlock and partisan rancor, the budget impasse may finally be broken. The President won increases in ‘non-defense’ spending as part of the deal, but the Pentagon will still gobble up more than 50% of the discretionary budget.  Allowed to increase spending at this pace, the Pentagon can look forward to its first trillion-dollar budget a decade from now.

Peace Action opposes the planned increases in Pentagon spending to $548 billion in fiscal 2016 and $551 billion in fiscal 2017.

The agreement would also increase the Pentagon slush fund, the Overseas Contingency Operations Fund (OCO), which is not subject to the budget caps. The deal would allow about $16 billion more than President Obama requested bringing the total number of tax dollars at the Pentagon’s disposal to over $600 billion for fiscal 2016.

Holding our elected leaders accountable for their rubber stamp approach to war and weapons spending is the first step.  With elections less than a year away, Peace Action is doing just that through our Peace Voter campaign.  Here’s an example of that work, as Will Hopkins, Executive Director of New Hampshire Peace Action asks Hillary Clinton about her “close ties to elements within the military industrial complex” last month on the Today show.

Peace Action continues to work with our allies on Capitol Hill pressing Congress to cut funding for big ticket items like the F-35 and nuclear overkill.  We are investing resources in our grassroots campaign to Move the Money from the Pentagon to meet the needs of our communities, working to build and strengthen local coalitions.  Over the past three years we have conducted workshops in 10 states training local activists in the workings – inside and out – of military budgets. Presently, we are planning trainings in Florida and Oregon for 2016.

More money for high-tech weaponry and unending war means less for our communities and people in need and less invested in green technologies necessary to avert climate disaster.  The federal budget is all about choices.

The federal budget represents our priorities as a nation and it should reflect our values. But powerful ideological forces and financial interests have hijacked the budget process for their own gain.

Martin Luther King Jr challenged us with the admonition, ‘those who love peace must learn to organize as effectively as those who love war.’

The political power required to bring democracy to decisions on federal budget priorities and foreign and military policies is not beyond us.  We are more than capable and we will make it happen.


Join us next week for Human Rights on the Hill at UDC!

May 29, 2015
Martin pontificating as usual!

Martin pontificating as usual!

Our executive director, Kevin Martin, will be speaking next Wednesday at 10:30 am, but the whole lineup for this annual course organized by former national Peace Action board member Joshua Cooper is outstanding, hope you can make one or more of these sessions!

Please join us at one or more sessions of this, the 14th annual Human Rights on the Hill program, organized by Joshua Cooper of the Hawaii Inst. for Human Rights at UDC David A. Clarke School of Law.  Each year, Cooper magically assembles an absolutely terrific line up of human rights activists, lawyers, government officials and policy wonks – see schedule below – to whose presentations interested students and citizens of all ages are cordially invited.

Venue: UDC David A. Clarke School of Law, Street address: 4340 Connecticut Ave.,Washington, DC 20008

The weeklong program is free, but please register here: http://www.law.udc.edu/event/HR14.

If you’d like to donate to support the program go to: www.law.udc.edu/donations and choose the general fund with a note to “HR 14”

Schedule:  14th Human Rights on the Hill 

Monday, June 1

9:00 a.m. The Peoples Voice at 70; From the Green Room in San Francisco to the Global Stage of Diplomacy & Decision-Making: Strong NGOs Means Stronger UN and The Best World Possible.

Joshua Cooper, Executive Director, Four Freedoms Forum

10:30 a.m. The Universal Periodic Review of the United States of America

Amanda J. Wall, Attorney Adviser, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State

12:00 p.m. Universal Periodic Review of the United States of America

UN Webcast TV

1:30 p.m. Business & Human Rights at the United Nations and the United States of America: The UN Forum & Working Group on Business and Human Rights Early Results as well as Current National Action Plan Progress and the Upcoming Initial Treaty Negotiations

John Richardson, Professorial Lecturer, School of International Service, American University

3:00-7:00 p.m.  TBA – Watch this space!

8:00 p.m. at Busboys & Poets

The News: Jeffrey Brown with Gwen Ifel

Tuesday, June 2

9:00 a.m.  The Universal Periodic Review of the United States of America:

An Opportunity to Organize Partnerships Across Communities in Our Country to Unite People for Rights Realization

Joshua Cooper, Executive Director,  Four Freedoms Forum

10:30 a.m. Local Human Rights Lawyering: Implementation of International Recommendations to Realize Right in Individuals Lives at the Community Level

Lauren Bartlett, Research and Training Director, Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, American University Washington College of Law & Director of Law Clinics and Assistant Professor of Law Ohio Northern University Petit College of Law

12:00 p.m. Universal Periodic Review of the United States of America

UN Webcast TV

1:30 p.m.  Gender Justice and Women’s Rights: Beijing+20 Beyond the Beltway in Our Beautiful Communities, Tarah Demant, Senior Director, Identity and Discrimination Unit, Amnesty International USA

3:00 p.m. The Implementation of the Universal Periodic Review Recommendations in the United States of America

Sakira Cook, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

7:00 p.m. at Busboys & Poets.  Stolen Futures:  Palestinian Children in Israeli Military

No Way to Treat a Child Campaign American Friends Service Committee

Wednesday, June 3

9:00 a.m. The United Nations Human Rights Charter Bodies and NGOs Ability to Advocate for Fundamental Freedoms

Joshua Cooper, Executive Director, Four Freedoms Forum

10:30 a.m. Peace is a Human Right: The UN Efforts on Demilitarization from NPT to Small Arms

Kevin Martin, Executive Director, Peace Action 

12:00 p.m.  Testify! Voices for Human Rights in the U.S.

WITNESS

12:30 p.m.  U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:  Current Status and Challenges Ahead

Jorge Araya, Secretary, Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Eric Rosenthal, Executive Director, Disability Rights International

1:30 p.m. The U.S. Foreign Policy of Drones & the Denial of Human Rights

Jeff Bachman, Ethics Peace & Global Affairs Program Co-Director, American University

3:00 p.m.  Implementation of the UPR Recommendations for Indigenous Peoples Human Rights in the U.S.

Christina Snider,  National Congress of the American Indians

5:00 p.m.  Strategies for Eco-Innovation: Open Source or Orthodox IP?

Jeremy DeBeer, Professor of Law, University of Ottawa

8:00 p.m.  White House Freedom of Speech Action

Implement the UPR Recommendations

Bring Human Rights Home

Thursday, June 4

9:00 a.m. The United Nations Human Rights Treaty Bodies Process & Participation: Growing a National Human Rights Movement Through the Ratification, Reporting and Realizing Recommendations from the UN Committees Responsible for Human Rights

Joshua Cooper, Executive Director, Four Freedoms Forum

10:30 a.m. A People Forgotten: Diego Garcia and the Exiled People of the Chagos Archipelago

David Vine, American University

12:00 p.m. The Treaty Bodies Bringing Human Rights Home

United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

1:30 p.m. Islamophobia & Muslims as Targets of the War on Terror:  Origins & Impacts

Maha Hilal, Deputy Executive Director, National Coalition to Protect Civil Freedoms

3:00 p.m. Panel: The United Nations Tells U.S. Government That Guantanamo is a Black Hole: Now What? A National Response to Restore Human Rights

James G. Connell III, Attorney

Raashid Williams, Major

Jennifer Kamorowski

Kim Lanoue-Chapman

Maha Hilal

Friday, June 5

9:00 a.m. Gun Violence in the United States of America

Jamira Burley, Senior Campaigner, Gun Violence and Criminal Justice,  Amnesty International USA

10:30 a.m. Bringing Human Rights Home

Jasmine Heiss, Senior Campaigner, Individuals at Risk, Amnesty International USA

12:00 p.m. The Lady Aung San Suu Kyi

Freedom to Lead

1:30 p.m.  A U.S. Congressional Mechanism to Promote and Protect Human Rights Around the World: The Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

 

 

 


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